How to Make a Travel Budget

How to Make a Travel Budget

When I left for Mexico years ago, all I had was a few thousand dollars, a desire to learn Spanish, and a vague dream to live and work in a country other than the United States. However, I had no specific strategy for implementation. I needed a plan.

My plan came in the form of a budget, a travel timeline of six months, and an end goal of steady income in Mexico.  My idea was to start in Mexico City, and head south through the country until an eventual arrival in Xela, Guatemala, a place renowned for its glut of language schools.  My itinerary was flexible, though it was the formation of a budget beforehand that allowed me to maximize my time in Mexico, and turn my vague dream into a definite reality.

Pre-Trip Costs

First, consider pre-trip costs, such as the flight to your destination. Depending on where you are going, this can be anywhere from $100 to $1000 USD. Save accordingly.
Consider additional pre-trip costs: visas, travel insurance, immunizations, a decent bag. This can set you back another $200-400. For Mexico, a tourist visa is given upon arrival ($20) and is valid for six months. To renew, you just need to cross the border out of Mexico, either into the U.S. or a Central American country.

Setting Your Budget

Your budget is determined by the kind of traveling you will be doing. Will you be staying in hostels or nice hotels? Do you prefer private cars or public transport? Do you pay top dollar for western cuisine or do you thrive on local food? In Mexico, I lived well on $35 a day. I rented private accommodations, used public transport, ate local fare, and took frequent day trips.

What to do in Chiapas - Palenque
Palenque, Chiapas

Below are cost estimates based on different styles of travel for destinations such as Mexico, South America, and North Africa. To see cost approximations for other countries, check out the crowd-sourced figures from Numbeo.com or BudgetYourTrip.com.

  • Budget (hostels, local food, day trips): $35/day
  • Mid-range (private rooms, western meals, frequent activities): $50/day
  • Luxury (nice hotels, lavish meals, private transport): $100/day

Regardless of lifestyle, building a travel budget is the same—begin with the number of days you would like to travel, then multiply that number by your daily cost estimate. For example, say you want to travel for six months, or you want a six-month financial cushion while you acclimate, travel, and network on your way to find steady work. Based on the estimates above, a six-month financial cushion for a “budget” lifestyle is $5400, “mid-range” is $9000, and “luxury” is $18,000. However, if needed, there are several ways you can reduce these numbers. That’s where I come in.  Below I offer a budget plan and savings tips for Oaxaca, though this advice can be applied to almost anywhere with a similar cost of living.

Cutting Costs – Accomodation

Accommodation can add up, especially if you value privacy. Shared rooms go for $10-25 a night and private rooms can be twice that much. If you pay $25 a night, you will be spending over $750 a month on accommodation alone. A great way to reduce this cost is to rent a room in one location and stay for a while.

Staying in one location allows you to use your “home” as a jumping off point for day trips and comes with the added benefit of community involvement. You are able to immerse yourself in the local culture, meet your neighbors, and glean information

Whenever I visited a new town, I would stay in a hostel while I scoured community boards in coffee shops and other tourist havens—oftentimes, there are plenty of advertisements for rooms to rent. In Oaxaca, especially, there were three coffee shops with endless information: Café Brujala, Café Nuevo Mundo, and Lobo Azul Tostadores.

Using those community boards allowed me to find a room in Oaxaca for $150 a month, including utilities.  This apartment was a twenty-minute walk from the city center, and while it was sparsely furnished, it was in a safe area, with a rooftop terrace, and all the amenities (i.e. bed, kitchen, bathroom, internet) I would need.

How to set a travel budget
My home in Oaxaca

By living in my Oaxaca apartment for two months, I was able to keep my spending to a minimum with a daily budget of $35. My private accommodation was $5 a day and I did the majority of my eating at home, buying fresh fruit and vegetables from the nearby ferias and mercados.  Local food is cost-friendly and is also an essential part of the authentic gastronomical experience.  However, I wasn’t overly strict—once or twice a week, I would eat out with locals, expats, or other travelers I had met.  Three meals a day, including superfluous drinks and treats, cost roughly $10-$15 a day.

Food and accommodation was half my daily budget, and the rest was free to spend how I pleased. The remaining $15-$20 a day went to Spanish lessons, special events, and trips (Hierve el Agua, Mitla, Monte Albán, Mazunte, San José del Pacífico, etc), or I saved what I didn’t spend.  In this way, one could live and travel comfortably through Oaxaca and beyond for six months—without working—for $5400.

However, I lived in Mexico for six months starting with only $3000.  How did I do it? Hostel Work and Volunteering.

Additional Ways to Save

Hostel Work

Aside from reducing daily expenses, another way to save is to work in a hostel.  Many hire travelers for reception, cleaning, or bartending in exchange for free accommodation and/or a stipend.  Websites such as Hostel Jobs and Hostel Management lets you find work before you go.  I secured a job in charming San Cristobal de Las Casas at the Iguana Hostel for two months, saved money on accommodation, earned $400, and had a fun and unique experience.

travel in Mexico
Iguana Hostel

Volunteer

Those two months at the Iguana Hostel allowed me to find other opportunities in San Cristobal—volunteer work.  For one month, I volunteered with La Casa del Pan, an organic restaurant located on one of the main tourist drags in San Cristobal.  My compensation was free accommodation and two meals in exchange for six hours of light farm work, five days a week.

Traveling through ChiapasHomestays

At the end of my time in San Cristobal, I rented scooters with some friends I had met while working in the hostel and we traveled through Chiapas.  After a couple days, we ended up at the border of Guatemala, where we parted ways. I headed towards Xela and they returned to San Cristobal.

In Xela, Guatemala, I ended up at the Spanish Language School, El Portal  where they set me up with a home-stay with a Guatemalan family.  A week’s worth of four hours of one-on-one language instruction a day, plus accommodation and three meals a day was around $150.  It was a great way to save money and learn Spanish.  I stayed for one month, dramatically advanced my Spanish, and was able to frequently travel the area (Lago Atitlan, Salcajá, Fuentes Georginas, San Andres de Xecul, Los Vahos, etc) all for less than $1000.

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Fulfilling the Dream

My financial plan played a huge role in my success in Mexico.  By utilizing a daily travel budget, I was able to live comfortably for six months with limited funds while I explored Mexico and Guatemala.  At the end of that period, I had made contacts from all over the country and found steady work in Mexico City– first as a private English teacher, then as a copywriter for a pineapple company, which in the end, launched my current career in freelance writing.

The rest, as they say, is budgeted history.

One Week in Morocco

One Week in Morocco

Marrakech, Morocco

Last year, I hit the road after a long absence.  I had been busy stuck at a job I hated and other excuses.  Luckily, I was jolted from my robotic reverie.

My dear friend, GIS badass, and frequent travel partner, emailed me.  She was working in West Asia and had a week of R & R coming to her in two weeks: can we meet up? Yes. Yes we can. We shot a few location ideas back and forth (Istanbul? Paris? Geneva? Morocco?) and after a quick survey of flight costs and scheduling, we decided on Morocco.  More precisely, Marrakech.

Time & its unfeeling partner, Money, allowed us just six days in Morocco.  At first thought, a week seemed achingly short, but second thought affirmed that one week is better than no week.  No doubt.

Traveling Marrakech Morocco
Marrakech

This was not to be a grand exploration of everything Morocco.  Six days is a good amount of time to become acquainted with one or two places—I did not want to run from kasbah to spire to mosque to square to market to train and repeat.  My needs were simple: quality chill time with my friend, soak up the Moroccan atmosphere, eat tagine, visit a hammam, and be open to impromptu happenings.

What follows are travel tips, reviews, and suggestions based off of my one week in Marrakech, Morocco.

Where to Stay in Marrakech

There are two distinct areas to stay in Marrakech—inside the traditional, high-walled Medina or outside.

Marrakech Medina
Medina Walls

Medina means “old town” and is present in almost every large, North African city.  The Medina of Marrakech is a red-tinted, entangled city section, mostly car-free and full of souks, riads, mosques, palaces, and the best-known square in North Africa (and UNESCO World Heritage Site),  Jemaa el-Fnaa.

Alternatively, you can stay in Guéliz, the modern counterpart to the Medina, full of upmarket shops, restaurants, bars, cafes, and hotels.

We stayed in the Medina, and spent no time in Guéliz, save the hour it took to rent a car, a solidly modern transaction.  If I were to do it again, I would still stay in the Medina. And I would still stay at the Riad Safa. 

Riads

Any reading about where to stay in Morocco will most certainly include the word, Riads. What are they? The shit.  Riads are traditional Moroccan guesthouses with an interior courtyard (usually with a fountain or citrus trees) and all of the rooms open into the central atrium space.  Their design encourages privacy, quiet, and cool escapes from the heat.

Riad Safa Marrakech
Inside Riad Safa

There are hundreds of riads in the Medina and it can be difficult to choose.  There are plenty of quality options, and we happened to stay at the Riad Safa, mostly because of its rhapsodic reviews and decent pricing.  There are 5 guestrooms set around two patios, with a gorgeous roof terrace, and clean, white Arab-Andalusian architecture. The cost ($50-60 a night for a 2-person room) includes an amazing breakfast of fresh squeezed orange juice from its courtyard trees, fruit, yogurt, toast, cheese, flatbread, jam, coffee and tea.  You can eat on the rooftop terrace which is the only way to start one’s day.

Breakfast Riad Safa Marrakech Morocco

The staff at Riad Safa were incredibly kind and readily available to answer questions and give advice.  You can pay for airport pickup and drop-off, which I recommend as it can be hard to find the place in the maze-like medina, though if you are down to try, go for it. As mentioned, the staff were essential in helping us hash out our Atlas Mountain trip (clearly, I now join the ranks of its enthusiastic reviewers).  It was quiet, picturesque, and just far enough away from the activity of Jemaa el-Fnaa, but close enough (15 minute walk) to access easily.

Getting around the Medina

You walk, you get lost, then you walk and get lost some more, but you won’t mind. There’s something interesting around every corner—snacks, mint tea, silver, leather, argon oil, spice, unasked for massages. The middle of the medina is the open space of the Jemaa el-Fnaa, and the main souks (shops selling everything you can imagine) are to the north.  Everything is walkable; a map helps, but many people are kind enough to help you find your way if you’re lost.

Map of Marrakech Medina
Map of Marrakech Medina

We spent three days walking through Marrakech, perusing the souks, drinking tea with shopkeepers, eating everything possible at Jemaa el-Fnaa…and we spent an entire evening in a hammam.

Hammams in Marrakech

A hammam is a Turkish bath—the Middle Eastern rendering of my culture’s steam room. I am a water therapy enthusiast, I love steam rooms and saunas in all countries. I make it a point to try every culture’s variant—Mexico’s temazcals, Laos’ herbal saunas, and now, Morocco’s Hammams.

Like the riads, Marrakech offers a wide variety of hammams for every price point and taste.  The super-traditional hammams cost around $5 and typically consist of shared spaces.  The more expensive hammams offer massage, showers, and usually a large woman to come in and scrub you down.  That’s what I wanted, and that’s what I got.

We chose  Les Bains de Marrakech, a cushy hammam located about 5 minutes south of  Jemaa el-Fnaa.  For the price of $50 each, we each had a session in the steam room, a rest period with tea and cookies(!), and an hour-long massage.

Hammam in Marrakech Morocco
Les Bains de Marrakech

Upon arrival, they directed us to the changing room–comfy showers, toilets, bathrobes, lockers.  After changing into robes we were led to a steam room, which consisted of a small room with two stone beds, some bowls of oil and clay, and shower.   The woman wiped us down with oil and left us to steam for 10 minutes or so.  Then, she re-entered and used a rough glove to scrub us down, and I mean scrub.  The semi-violent sloughing felt amazing, and afterwards we were again covered with some clay and left to sweat. Note: Hammams are not for the shy.  You are naked and the woman scrubs down every part of you…and I mean every part. You kind of feel like a giant baby, and it’s nice.

After the sweat session, you take a shower, put the bathrobe back on and are again led to a quiet, small room within a dimly lit lounge.  Water, mint tea, and cookies(!) are brought to you as you cool down and wait for the next session, which for us, was massage.

If you want to pamper yourself, get rid of some layers of skin, or clean up after some dusty traveling, I cannot recommend a trip to a hammam enough…and did I mention, they give you cookies(!)?

The Atlas Mountains

I knew nothing about the Atlas Mountains before going to Morocco, and now I know a little bit more than nothing.  Here it is: the Atlas Mountains span Morocco, Algeria, and Tunisia, providing a barrier between the Mediterranean coastline and the Sahara Desert.  The range is 1,600 miles long, dug in by canyons and ravines, and peppered with Berber villages. Berbers are a badass ethnic group that’s been around North Africa for thousands of years.  In the early days they were nomadic herdsman and traders, and now, the majority live in the Atlas Mountains workings as farmers, merchants, and craftsmen. They have their own language, customs, style of dress, and they give me culture envy.

Berbers in Morocco
Chez Lahna and Ali

After talking it over with our host in Marrkech, my travel mate and I decided to rent a car and drive through the Atlas Mountains. The ksar (mud-brick-fortified village) of Aït Benhaddou, a UNESCO World Heritage Site and famous film spot, was only a three hour drive away, and we heard the drive was worth it.

Atlas Mountains Travel Morocco

The Atlas Mountains

We rented a car and took our time driving.  We ate lunch, took photos, got pulled over…twice.  By nightfall we arrived to the tiny village of Aït Benhaddou.   Our hotel of choosing (out of two or three, I think), was the quietly fantastic Bagdad Cafe, run by a warm and welcoming Moroccan-French couple.  They serve traditional Moroccan dinner and breakfast (which is GREAT because the rest of the place was a ghost town).  Our plan for the next day was to explore the ksar and then drive 7 hours north to Casablanca, where I would catch my flight the following morning.

ait ben haddou morocco
View of Aït Benhaddou from the Ksar

The ksar of Aït Benhaddou is exactly what I imagined when I imagined Moroccan forts:  Dusty, labyrinthine, and magical.

ait-ben-haddou

Aït Benhaddou

We left around noon and drove on, enjoying the scenery along the way, commenting that the Atlas mountain landscape looked a little bit like Utah, but not exactly, because we wanted to affirm we were somewhere other than the United States.  We drove on, and we drove on, and then we were hungry.  cats in moroccoEventually we saw a restaurant sign and pulled over. A Berber man and a small cat came out to greet us and he let us choose where to sit on the empty plateau.

We split a classic Moroccan meal: bell pepper, onion, and tomato salad, chicken tagine, and mint tea.  While we ate, our Berber host—Ali—chatted with us about history, politics, Mexico, Iraq, and how much he hates dogs.  He had studied history at a French university and was now working as  a trained guide in the Atlas Mountains.

We talked about the kasbah of Telouet, which was right across the road.  It didn’t look like much, but the quiet walk was an intimate experience as Ali explained the history of the area, the Berber people, and the construction (and ruin and refurbishment) of the kasbah.

Kasbah of Teloue
Kasbah of Telouet

Parts of the exterior of the castle were either total rubble or close to it.  Once inside, however, everything changed.

Interior Kasbah of Telouet
Interior

The interior and central rooms survived the decades of decay, and they are decorated with elaborate stucco pillars, resplendent mosaics, and Moorish doorways.

inside kasbah of telouet

We left and continued onto to Casablanca, where I would catch my flight the following day.  I left humbled and fascinated by the history, hospitality, and mores of Morocco.

So yes, I say one week is in Morocco is better than none.

No doubt.

 

Guatemalan Graveyards

Guatemalan Graveyards

El Calvario

Homo sapiens have been burying their dead for at least 100,000 years.  Every culture has their own way of dealing with death, and the graveyard is key in laying the dead to eternal rest.

El Calvario Xela Guatemala

El Calvario is one of the oldest cemeteries in Guatemala.  Located in Quetzaltenango (or Xela), El Calvario is a lush, green hillside, dotted with colorful slabs, Roman-style tombs, and Gothic, Baroque, Classical, and Neoclassical mausoleums and sculptures. From the graveyard you can see the Santa Maria volcano in the distance, encased by clouds.  It’s beautiful, eerie, and fantastic.

Guatemalan Graveyards

El Calvario Cemetery in Guatemala

Guatemalan cemetery decor

tombstones in central america

colorful graveyard

Vanushka Guatemala Cemetery
Vanushka

Xela graveyard

guatemalan graveyards

cool cemeteries

Have Smartphone, will travel.

Have Smartphone, will travel.

When I traveled before the world of smartphones, I would either a) not use a phone, or b) use an old Nokia with a country-specific SIM card.  Now, I am reveling in the glories that are smartphones: The access! The simulated feeling of safety and knowledge! Google!

If you want to travel but perhaps have some trepidation about maneuvering public transportation in foreign countries, finding decent places to stay, or don’t have a lot of extra cash to blow, this article is for you.  I specifically focus budget travel in Mexico, complete with a review on all the modern-day amenities that come with using a smartphones—connections to Uber, AirBnB, and even 4G data if you want it.

International Cell Service

I am a Verizon customer, and for my short-term trip to Mexico, I utilized Verizon’s International Plan.  For US customers traveling to Mexico or Canada, this plan is great.  For $2/day (in addition to your normal rate), you have access to the same amount of texts, minutes, and data in your destination country as you do at home.  However, if you’re headed to Europe or Asia, the cost jumps up to $10/day, so depending on your needs, you may be better off using your cell phone just as a camera or as a connection to wifi.  For example, when I was in Morocco, I did just that. I kept my cell phone on Airplane Mode and used it just for photos and as a timepiece.  When I was in my hotel or a cafe, I turned on the wifi and used it to check email or browse the internet.  If you must have a cell phone, there are always solutions.

I know AT&T has a pay-per-use and Passport Plan, and T-Mobile offers international travel rates as well.  Check with your cell phone service provider to see what they offer and what works best with your plans.

Uber

Uber and other such ride-sharing companies exist almost everywhere (except where I reside for some reason).  While I was waiting in the Mexico City Airport, I began talking with the people around me, and each person raved about how wonderful Uber was in the city, how easy, how inexpensive! I decided to go with a normal taxi first and download Uber later.

The taxi ride from the airport to my centrally located AirBnb was 200 pesos, which isn’t much considering the 19:1 exchange rate at the time.  However, if I had taken Uber instead, I would’ve  paid less than 100 pesos—half the price I paid using a taxi.  Take a look at the price breakdown below.  All in all, I only used a taxi twice (the second time was because I had no cell service in the TAPO bus station).  All other times I used Uber, the Metro, or walked.

Uber Costs Mexico
Uber vs. Taxi

Besides the monetary savings with the use of Uber, I appreciated the added aspects of safety and convenience.  Years ago, when I was living and traveling  in Mexico, I felt safe the majority of the time, but I did have a few instances where taxi drivers attempted to impose their will onto mine.  I want to stress that in my two years of traveling alone, I took hundreds of taxis and this only happened a few times—it is not the norm.  That being said, with Uber, both the driver’s information and mine is stored in the system.  There’s a record of where I was, when I got picked up, and where I was going. If that doesn’t give you peace of mind, I don’t know what will.

And, as mentioned, the convenience is great.  While metered taxis will charge by distance and time, there are some taxis with which you have to agree upon a price.  If you know where you’re going and how much it typically costs, you should be fine, but if you don’t, you’ll end up paying more than you should.  Uber puts this concern at rest as the cost of the trip is already determined.  You can take it or leave it.

Air Bnb

Yes, yes, we all know about AirBnb.  Love it or hate it, it sure makes budget travel easier.  I love it because I don’t want to stay in shared hostel rooms anymore.  I did that in my twenties, and as I get older I realize that there’s nothing I love more than some goddam privacy.  Plus, I like having a plethora of options when it comes to location, price, and style.

AirBnb In Mexico City

L-R: Studio in Condesa, Rooftop terrace in Escandon

In Mexico City, I stayed in two different colonias (neighborhoods), and a different AirBnb in each one.  One in Colonia Condesa, and one in Colonia Escandon (my old stomping grounds.  Each one was in a great location—walkable, close to food, bars, and parks, and also close to the Metro.  The AirBnb in Colonia Condesa was a terraced building, offering several types of rooms, all with a kitchen, balcony, and private bathroom.  The small, rooftop studio in Colonia Escandon didn’t have a kitchen, but did have a small fridge, hotplate, and a roof terrace to hang out on.  Both were about $27 dollars a night

AirBnb, Uber, and International Data Plans are just a few of the obvious conveniences that come with smartphone travel.  There are thousands of apps designed to make travel easier.  Control is in your hands—use it and go.

Hiking El Volcán Chicabal

Hiking El Volcán Chicabal

Quetzaltenango, Guatemala

If you find yourself in Guatemala, go to Quetzaltenango (which shall henceforth be referred to as the locals do—Xela).  This walkable little city is marked by twisted streets, Gothic architecture, a good selection of restaurants, and hundreds of Spanish language schools.  When people visit, they stay for a while.

But this post is not about Xela; rather, it is a post about one of the many places you can get to from Xela.  This is about La Laguna de Chicabal.

hikes near xela guatemala volcan chicabal
Photo Courtesy of XelaWho

About the Magical Laguna Chicabal

Laguna Chicabal is a crater lake nestled at the summit of  El Volcán Chicabal.  Volcán Chicabal is a caldera which stands at 8,920 feet (2,720 m) in the midst of a cloud forest.

The lake itself is 1090 feet (331 m) deep and the backdrop of the cloud forest makes a perfect habitat for native birds such as quetzals and pink-headed warblers.

This magical place is considered a sacred place of cosmic convergence by the Mam Maya.  It is a place for regular ceremonies and offerings—evidence of such is shown in the altars positioned at different points along the laguna’s shores.

Because of this,  Laguna Chicabal is preserved as a sacred site, and visitors are asked to respect the lake and grounds and not go swimming in the hallowed waters.

travel to xela guatemala laguna de chicabal
Altars around Laguna Chicabal

Getting to the Volcán

If you are staying in Xela, it is relatively straightforward to get to the base of El Volcán Chicabal.  The volcán itself is located in the municipal boundary of the pueblo San Martín Sacatepéquez,  an 45-minute bus ride away.

map of quetzaltenango xela guatemala

To catch the bus, go to the Minerva Terminal in Xela and hop on one of the many buses to San Martín Sacatepéquez (cost: 5Q).  The buses run every day from 6 am-5 pm, though note that they run with less frequency on Sundays.

Once the bus passes into San Martín, you will see a large sign for Laguna Chicabal Park — this is where you get off.  If you are nervous about missing the stop, tell the driver you are going to Laguna Chicabal and most likely he let you know.  The starting point for the volcán is in the center of tiny San Martín, and the road winds through its small neighborhoods before heading up the slopes. This allows you a peak into the life of the local population of San Martín; the majority use the lower slopes of the volcano for agricultural purposes.

Hiking the Volcán

The hike to the entrance station of La Laguna Chicabal Park is approximately 1.5 hours from the center of town.  These town roads can be convoluted and confusing, so if you get lost don’t be afraid to ask a local to point you in the right direction. Very quickly the trail heads uphill — make sure you pack water, snacks, and a sweatshirt.

When you reach the entrance station you will see an open field and some buildings. This is where you pay the entrance fee of Q15 and you will often see families picnicking or playing fùtbol.

Entrance to Laguna Chicabal Xela Guatemala
Entrance to La Laguna Chicabal

From the entrance to the edge of the crater is another 45-minute walk.  About two-thirds of the way up you’ll reach a fork, where you can either go right to head directly to the water’s edge, or left up to the miradores (lookouts), and then down 600+ wooden steps down to the edge of the lake.

Once you are by the water’s edge, you will see a path that circumnavigates the lake.  This tranquil trail  is less than a mile long, and the beautiful, peaceful environment allows for a reflective and profound experience.   As mentioned before, you can usually see leftover altars, camp areas, and fire pits.

camping around laguna chicabal xela

If it’s a clear day, you’ll be able to see several large Guatemalan volcanoes from the miradores.  If it’s foggy, the only thing you’ll be seeing from the miradores is the inside of a cloud.  When I visited, the entire hike up was shrouded in fog, but dissipated by the time I reached the water’s edge.

Returning to Xela

Walk back down the way you came, and once you get back into San Martín, just go out to the road and wait for a bus returning towards Xela. If you have doubts, just ask, “Xela?” as you board the bus and the driver will let you know.

 

Entering the Fog

Entering the Fog

Yesterday I hiked a volcano and I thought it would be a nice outing with the sun and a steady-but-not-too-steep-incline ending with a lake and a pretty  view of water and land. 

I needed that.  Life was getting away from me, and I had been feeling confused, foggy. I wanted some peace, some water, some time to think.

It was almost all  those things but imagine if they were dipped in the Eternal Fuck You and then laid out to dry in the Continual Yes. Two hours of upward pain broken by moments of reverie. A man and his child touting wood.  A cow meandering along the path.  The cry of a bird.

hiking to laguna chicabal guatemala

At the summit, I walked directly into a cloud and could see nothing. I was standing above the cratered-lake but couldn’t see a thing because nature doesn’t give a fuck about vistas or your plan, and to tell you the truth, it didn’t really bother me because at this point I am finally getting used to hurricane beaches and cloudy viewpoints and who am I to complain when the clouds decide to swoop in? Hiking endorphins just made me happy to be there, breathing hard and deep.

I descended billions of wooden stairs to the lake’s edge and it felt like Loch Ness — all fog and monster. I decided to walk around the lake because I was there and it was so tranquil and quiet and creepy. I knew I had to.

Laguna Chicabal Guatemala

I started walking and the fog was oscillating between thick and thin and I could see Mayan altars in the water… it was beautiful and eerie and I had no fear of anything.  For the first time in a long time, I felt happy and mystical and lucky.

Maya Altars Laguna Chicabal Guatemala

I continued walking around the lake and as I did, there were more altars on the shore and the fog and clouds were rising and thinning and going and by the time I finished my circumambulation, they all had lifted and I could see across the lake and into the sky and it was  gorgeous and clear and if that’s not a metaphor what is?

Guatemala hiking laguna de chicabal xela

 

Travel to San Francisco on a Budget

Travel to San Francisco on a Budget

This year, as Spring arrived holding the hand of its younger brother, Baseball Season, my partner and I had the itch to take a trip  — Oh, San Francisco! Reveal to us your glory! Give us baseball! Give us food! Please don’t rain!

I began looking for an affordable place to stay, but it seemed all I could find was a list of overly expensive hotels or completely rundown, poorly located flophouses, and I wondered, “Wait, am I googling Tokyo?” “Is the yuppie takeover complete?” “IS NOTHING SACRED?!”

Budget Travel Is Possible

Despair not, fellow shallow-pocketed travelers.  My partner and I were able to enjoy a three day, two night San Francisco trip for under $500 and it didn’t even feel strained.  If you’re traveling solo you could do it for even less.

Keep in mind this travel budget is biased to my preferences–where I may spend $90 on food and $140 on entertainment, you may prefer to invert the two.  This is simply a platform from which you can plan your own trip.

  • Getting there: $100
  • Staying there: $170
  • Eating & Drinking: $90
  • Things to Do: $140

Getting There

Round trip:  two tanks of gas, two toll booths, one In-n-Out stop (it’s the law)  = $100.

Given my current location in the isolated northern reaches of California (approximately 300 miles north of the city), driving is the most convenient and economical option to get to San Francisco.

Depending on your location, one of the many buses, planes, or trains which serve the San Francisco area may be a better choice.  This kind of transport may be the wisest option, as you don’t need (nor do you want) a car to heave around while in the city.  San Francisco’s public transportation is excellent, wide-reaching, and cheap. Driving is a pain in the ass and parking can easily add $50 or more to your trip.  We were able to park the car and not touch it again until we were ready to leave.

Okay, if you live across the country, transport will clearly be the biggest expense when traveling to San Francisco.  Plan ahead and keep your eye out for cheap flights to SFO.  If you have an economical vehicle, consider making it a road trip, or take the train cross-country.

Staying There

2 nights in one-bed Mission apartment = $170 

Cheap hotel in San Francisco
Our Room in Mission Dolores

As mentioned previously, the hotel situation in San Francisco is dire.  However, the AirBnb situation is off-the-hook.  There are options for any location and any budget, just set the maximum amount you want to spend and take it from there. Our $85/night room in the Mission was gorgeous, clean, and close to public transport, bars, and food.

Spend Less: Do you have a friend or family member in San Francisco? Hit them up, perhaps you can crash on their floor.  Try Couchsurfing, stay at the Green Tortoise Hostel, or look for hotels just outside the city, but close to a BART station for easy access.

Eating and Drinking

Various places = $90

I have some friends who love to visit San Francisco specifically for the food.  Their trip revolves around wining and dining, and their spending reflects that.  I am more of a hole-in-the-wall kind of ingestor, and my  budget here, reflects that.

I wanted to eat everything, and we almost did.  In Chinatown, we had green tea and plate full of Dim Sum from Dol Ho ($15), and we walked away from Garden Bakery with a bag full of baked buns for breakfast ($5); in the Mission, we had crispy carnitas tacos from Taqueria El Buen Sabor ($15), foot-long servings of lamb shawarma and falafel from Truly Mediterranean ($20), and beers from the 500 Club ($40).

Spend Less: We brought sandwich and snack supplies with us so that we didn’t eat out every meal; we also purchased beers from the grocery store to enjoy whenever we damned-well-pleased.

Things to Do

There are countless things you can do in San Francisco — museums, theaters, parks, galleries, bookstores, coffee shops, neighborhoods.  We passed on the popular Fisherman’s Wharf, Ghirardelli Square, and Union Square tourist attractions.  We had both been there before, and were more interested in seeing some other parts of San Francisco. Here is what we did, all for around $140. 

Walk Across Golden Gate Bridge (Free):

Walking across the Golden Gate Bridge is a charming way to check out the northern views of the peninsula,  Alcatraz, and the Bay Bridge.  You can also get a closer look at the Art Deco design on the international-orange-painted towers and feel weird when you look over the edge into the water and contemplate the number of people who have jumped off (1600).

Walk Across the Golden Gate Bridge
Photo Courtesy of Ramiro Checchi

There are a few free parking areas on the northern and southern ends of the bridge.  While there is a clearly marked “vista point” and parking area on the North Side, it is only accessible when driving north on the 101 and is often full of cars and tour buses. We found two great places to park: North Tower Golden Gate Parking (Conzelman Rd), and down the hill at Fort Baker.

Golden gate bridge free parking
1. North Tower Golden Gate Parking (Conzelman Road) 2. Fort Baker

Directions to Free Parking: If you’re driving south on the 101, you can get to the first location, (1) North Tower Golden Gate Parking (Conzelman Road) by taking exit 442 towards Sausalito, and then following Alexander Ave and Conzelman Road to the end (or, simply punch North Tower Golden Gate Parking into your GPS).

The second location, (2) Fort Baker, is a great spot if you want to sit below the bridge, eat a sandwich and gaze across the water.  The bridge is accessible from there, you just have to hoof it up the hilly, but paved, Conzelman Road for about 1 mile.  To get there, exit 101 South at exit 442 toward Sausalito, turn right onto Alexander Ave (signs for Sausalito), turn left onto Bunker Road, then turn right to stay on Bunker Road, which eventually turns right again and becomes Murray Circle. Continue Straight onto Moore Road and drive until you can’t anymore. Parking is available on the side of the road.  If you want to use GPS, punch in 411 Moore Road, Sausalito.

Chinatown & City Lights Bookstore (Free-$20):

Chinatown San FranciscoOnce we crossed the Golden Gate Bridge into North San Francisco, we were hungry.  We decided to go to Chinatown; I wanted Dim Sum, and we both wanted to peruse City Lights, the landmark bookstore and publisher, which was nearby.  We easily found metered parking  (on Washington Street) and walked north through the streets of Chinatown until we came upon Dol Ho, where all my cheap and delicious Dim Sum dreams came true.  Dim Sum, or cha siu bao, are steamed buns filled with pork, vegetables, shrimp, beans, chicken, et cetera and so forth.   We split a plate of 12 for  about $15, then walked over City Lights to spend about an hour in book heaven.  If you cross Columbus Avenue (the big street on which City Light is located), you’ll be in “Little Italy,” which is denoted by red, white, and green stripes painted on the light poles.  The Beat Museum is there, along with a large variety of titty bars, porn shops, and I’m assuming, Italian food.

Catch a Baseball Game ($10-120):

Even if you’re not a huge fan of the great American past time, spending an afternoon at AT&T Park feels quintessential and cheerful.  The park is beautiful and fun to explore, the fans are notably polite, and almost every seat in the house has a great view.

AT&T Park San Francisco
A beautiful day for baseball at AT&T Park

Ticket costs will depend on where you sit, who the Giants are playing, and what day you go.  We saw the beloved Chicago Cubs on a Saturday afternoon, which was a popular, sold-out game—we spent $50 each for our seats.  I purchased the tickets from StubHub, where you’ll find a lot of season-ticket holders selling their seats for a decent price.  You can often find standing-room only tickets and bleacher seats starting from $10, so, really, there is something for everyone.

Spend Less: Note that beers are $12, a Hot Dog is $6, Garlic Fries are $8, and a bag of peanuts will set you back $5.  To spend less, either buy cheap seats and go crazy with food and drink, or buy better seats and bring snacks.  Priorities.

To Get There:

San Francisco Muni to AT&T Park
Taking the Muni to AT&T Park

AT&T Park was designed with public transportation in mind, so it is easy to get there. From our room in the Mission, we walked about 5 minutes north to the Metro Church Station, where we bought two round-trip Muni ticket for $9.  Then, we boarded the inbound T-Third for Sunnydale.  About 20 minutes later, we got off at the 2nd and King Street Station, right outside of AT&T Park.

Alternatively, according to the Giants Website:

Muni Metro Streetcar service to the Ballpark is available daily on the N-Judah, T-Third and via other Muni Metro streetcar lines on game days. Fans can transfer from any Metro line to streetcars serving the ballpark at Embarcadero Station – look for trains headed to Mission Bay, Caltrain or Sunnydale and get off at the Second Street/Ballpark Station. Muni buses 10, 30, 45 and 47 also stop within one block of the ballpark.

Golden Gate Park/Haight (free-$10)

Walking through Golden Gate Park is a great way to kill a few hours—it’s full of activity and you can just sit on a grassy hill and watch all kinds of people come and go.  There’s a cool botanical garden, along with a couple museums, and various other gardens and attractions.

Map of Golden Gate Park When we were done walking around, we left via Haight Street on the East Side.  We walked through the Haight, got a couple beers (yes, it’s a theme), and then caught the Muni back to the Mission.

Walk Around the Mission (Free):

We probably spent the most time walking around the neighborhood where we were staying.  The Mission offers a first-hand look at gentrification and hipster culture.  It is a weird mix of “super cool” coffee shops, restaurants, and skinny jeans on Valencia Street and family groceries, no-name taquerias, and store fronts on Mission. Walking through Mission fills me with historical wonder and guilt as I simultaneously reap the benefits and judge the pervasive cancer of gentrification.

Dolores Park is a great place to relax and drink a beer, have a picnic, or read a book.  There’s a cast of colorful characters and a slew of people coming and going which makes for great people-watching.  If it’s a nice day, or even if it’s not, don’t expect to have the park to yourself.  It is definitely a destination.

The Murals in the Mission are beautiful, colorful, and worth walking around to see—this also allows you the opportunity to see all parts of the Mission and get some historical context to the area.  Here is a great guide to all San Francisco’s Mission District Murals.

Mission District Mural San Francsisco
Photo Courtesy of Rafael

Go!

You do not have to be rich to enjoy some of the joys of San Francisco. There are plenty of ways to stay cheaply, eat cheaply, and still get your fill of that sweet, sweet San Francisco love.

Any other recommendations for places to stay, eat, or enjoy in SF for those on a budget? Share the informational wealth in the comments!